'We have tidings from Rome that the King is straitly commanded to put away my lady Anne, and take back his first wife, and their young child to be proclaimed base-born, “by the last day of Sept. next coming,” on pain of interdiction of the whole realm. Images are taken from their places, and cast out of the church as stocks and stones of no value. Some will prick them with their bodkins to see whether they will bleed or no. These with many other damnable abusions we have in London. Flesh and fish are cheap, but cheese is dear.’

- Sir John Rose, 18 October 1533. He’s got his priorities sorted. Great Matter, destruction of churches, oh and don’t forget the most important issue - that cheese is getting a bit expensive.

Anonymous asked:

Why did you do if you were shortsighted in tudor times was there glasses?

Yes, they had glasses. Henry VIII himself owned quite a few pairs in his later years, as did Charles V.

Of course, opticians and prescription lenses did not exist - science in England was not that advanced. It would have been a kind of ‘one lens suits all’ situation. Glasses were also very expensive and therefore only available to the wealthier ranks of society.

Glasses in Tudor times did not have arms, but were instead balanced on the nose, like early pince-nez. They were not often worn in public, as they were an obvious indication that the wearer had poor eyesight and was, therefore, ‘weak’, which was not really how the social elite wanted to be seen. Due to this, they are almost never seen in portraits from this period.

archaicwonder:

Letters from Queen Elizabeth about Mary Queen of Scots
This was a highly important cache of letters unknown to historians and biographers, covering an important but little-known period in the long captivity of Mary, Queen of Scots. The letters were written to Sir Ralph Sadler while he was entrusted with the custody of Mary, Queen of Scots in 1584 to 1585. Some are also signed by Lord Burghley, Francis Walsingham and the Earl of Leicester. The letters address such subjects as the conditions and security of the Scottish Queen’s confinement, and her negotiations with Queen Elizabeth. For more details about the letters please visit the source.
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archaicwonder:

Letters from Queen Elizabeth about Mary Queen of Scots
This was a highly important cache of letters unknown to historians and biographers, covering an important but little-known period in the long captivity of Mary, Queen of Scots. The letters were written to Sir Ralph Sadler while he was entrusted with the custody of Mary, Queen of Scots in 1584 to 1585. Some are also signed by Lord Burghley, Francis Walsingham and the Earl of Leicester. The letters address such subjects as the conditions and security of the Scottish Queen’s confinement, and her negotiations with Queen Elizabeth. For more details about the letters please visit the source.
Zoom Info

archaicwonder:

Letters from Queen Elizabeth about Mary Queen of Scots

This was a highly important cache of letters unknown to historians and biographers, covering an important but little-known period in the long captivity of Mary, Queen of Scots. The letters were written to Sir Ralph Sadler while he was entrusted with the custody of Mary, Queen of Scots in 1584 to 1585. Some are also signed by Lord Burghley, Francis Walsingham and the Earl of Leicester. The letters address such subjects as the conditions and security of the Scottish Queen’s confinement, and her negotiations with Queen Elizabeth. For more details about the letters please visit the source.

(via coldasawindseabreeze)

mistress-tudor:

Long-lost picture of Henry VIII as a child discovered
The unknown painting, which is contained in a passional manuscript, shows the monarch as a young boy, weeping upon a bed with his two sisters.
The book is believed to have been written and donated to Henry the VII upon the death of his wife Elizabeth of York, and passed into the possession of a noble family.
The picture, one of several dozen in the Vaux passional, shows Henry as a child, with his red head buried in his arms on his late mother’s bed. His sisters Mary and Margaret are depicted sitting on the floor near to him, while his father sits on a throne in the foreground.
Saying Henry VIII was depicted as a child “very infrequently,” he added: “He felt the death of his mother more than anybody; it really, really rocked him. He was absolutely inconsolable.
x
Zoom Info
mistress-tudor:

Long-lost picture of Henry VIII as a child discovered
The unknown painting, which is contained in a passional manuscript, shows the monarch as a young boy, weeping upon a bed with his two sisters.
The book is believed to have been written and donated to Henry the VII upon the death of his wife Elizabeth of York, and passed into the possession of a noble family.
The picture, one of several dozen in the Vaux passional, shows Henry as a child, with his red head buried in his arms on his late mother’s bed. His sisters Mary and Margaret are depicted sitting on the floor near to him, while his father sits on a throne in the foreground.
Saying Henry VIII was depicted as a child “very infrequently,” he added: “He felt the death of his mother more than anybody; it really, really rocked him. He was absolutely inconsolable.
x
Zoom Info

mistress-tudor:

Long-lost picture of Henry VIII as a child discovered

The unknown painting, which is contained in a passional manuscript, shows the monarch as a young boy, weeping upon a bed with his two sisters.

The book is believed to have been written and donated to Henry the VII upon the death of his wife Elizabeth of York, and passed into the possession of a noble family.

The picture, one of several dozen in the Vaux passional, shows Henry as a child, with his red head buried in his arms on his late mother’s bed. His sisters Mary and Margaret are depicted sitting on the floor near to him, while his father sits on a throne in the foreground.

Saying Henry VIII was depicted as a child “very infrequently,” he added: “He felt the death of his mother more than anybody; it really, really rocked him. He was absolutely inconsolable.

x

(via video-et-taceo)

Anonymous asked:

What's your opinion on Henry's mental health? Did his injury change him? Or was he a psychopath??

My personal opinion is that yes, his injury in 1536 changed him. Henry had always been under a lot of pressure - he was only the second monarch in a new House which wasn’t proving particularly strong (Arthur dying young, Henry becoming king at 17). The pressure to provide a son was huge and I think this motivated many of his pre-1536 actions. Yet he never acted in a truly unreasonable or very extreme manner before 1536.

His jousting accident in 1536 was major - he was unconscious for 2 hours which when you think that nowadays 10 minutes is considered a potentially dangerously long time, 2 hours is definitely a cause for concern. Also, it was after this that Henry started to suffer from horrendous headaches which continued throughout his life. To me, these two facts would suggest that some level of damage was caused by that accident. From a documentary I saw, they explained that based on historical records, the area of Henry’s brain that was most likely to have been affected by the accident was the area controlling personality. It was after 1536 that Henry’s personality - and his temper - seem to have become a lot more extreme. I would never call him a psychopath, but I definitely believe that his injury in 1536 changed him and had a significant impact on his mental health. I would actually go as far to suggest that Anne’s fall was partly a result of Henry’s personality change after his accident.

queenanne-boleyn:


THE ring is going to be IS NOW on public display!

Between September 2014 and March 2015, THE Elizabeth I ring with the miniature of Anne Boleyn inside it will be on public display at the National Portrait Gallery, London, England!

Head to London now to see it for free! I can’t wait to go! Here is more information about the exhibition.

queenanne-boleyn:

THE ring is going to be IS NOW on public display!

Between September 2014 and March 2015, THE Elizabeth I ring with the miniature of Anne Boleyn inside it will be on public display at the National Portrait Gallery, London, England!

Head to London now to see it for free! I can’t wait to go! Here is more information about the exhibition.


Anne in The Tudors: fact or fiction? - 5/?

Series 1, Episode 3. Thomas Wyatt and Anne Boleyn. The average date in this episode is 1522 (Chateau Vert, Anne as Katherine of Aragon’s maid, Charles V and Mary’s betrothal are all 1522). Yet in this scene Wyatt tells Anne that he has separated from his wife, which didn’t actually happen until 1524. Furthermore, in 1522, Anne was involved to a debatable extent with Henry Percy (who, annoyingly, along with James Butler, doesn’t feature in The Tudors). So it’s pretty unlikely that she was busy ending a romance with Wyatt. I like this first glimpse of Anne’s personality that we see in this scene - her independence and strong moral values about refusing to get involved with a married man (which of course became more famous later on). I view the relationship between Wyatt and Anne as one-sided - with him having a crush on her and writing poetry about her. However, even if they did ever have a bit of a flirtation under a tree as is seen here, this scene is still fictional as it would not have been in 1522 given Anne’s involvement with Percy, and the dialogue in this scene does not fit with the timing of the rest of the episode from Wyatt’s point of view either.

Anne in The Tudors: fact or fiction? - 5/?

Series 1, Episode 3. Thomas Wyatt and Anne Boleyn. The average date in this episode is 1522 (Chateau Vert, Anne as Katherine of Aragon’s maid, Charles V and Mary’s betrothal are all 1522). Yet in this scene Wyatt tells Anne that he has separated from his wife, which didn’t actually happen until 1524. Furthermore, in 1522, Anne was involved to a debatable extent with Henry Percy (who, annoyingly, along with James Butler, doesn’t feature in The Tudors). So it’s pretty unlikely that she was busy ending a romance with Wyatt. I like this first glimpse of Anne’s personality that we see in this scene - her independence and strong moral values about refusing to get involved with a married man (which of course became more famous later on). I view the relationship between Wyatt and Anne as one-sided - with him having a crush on her and writing poetry about her. However, even if they did ever have a bit of a flirtation under a tree as is seen here, this scene is still fictional as it would not have been in 1522 given Anne’s involvement with Percy, and the dialogue in this scene does not fit with the timing of the rest of the episode from Wyatt’s point of view either.